Home » The Storming of Stony Point on the Hudson, Midnight, July 15, 1779: Its Importance in the Light by Henry Phelps Johnston
The Storming of Stony Point on the Hudson, Midnight, July 15, 1779: Its Importance in the Light Henry Phelps Johnston

The Storming of Stony Point on the Hudson, Midnight, July 15, 1779: Its Importance in the Light

Henry Phelps Johnston

Published July 24th 2012
ISBN :
Paperback
244 pages
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 About the Book 

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... AUTHORITIES No. 1 KINGMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1900 edition. Excerpt: ... AUTHORITIES No. 1 KING GEORGE TO LORD NORTH ON THE AMERICAN WAR Kkw, Junk 11, 1779, 25 Mins. Pt. 10 A. M. . . . . I should think it the greatest instance among the many I have met with of ingratitude and injustice, if it could be supposed that any man in my dominions more ardently desired the restoration of peace and solid happiness in every part of this empire than I do- there is no personal sacrifice I could not readily yield for so desirable an object- but at the same time no inclination to get out of the present difficulties, which certainly keep my mind very far from a state of ease, can incline me to enter into what I look upon as the destruction of the empire. I have heard Lord North frequently drop that the advantages to be gained by this contest could never repay the expence- I owne that, let any war be ever so successful, if persons will sit down and weigh the expences, they will find, as in the last, that it has impoverished the State, enriched individuals, and perhaps raised the name only of the conquerors- but this is only weighing such events in the scale of a tradesman behind the counter- it is necessary for those in the station it has pleased Divine Providence to place me to weigh whether expences, though very great, are not sometimes necessary to prevent what might be more ruinous to a country than the loss of money. The present contest with America I cannot help seeing as the most serious in which any country was ever engaged- it contains such a train of consequences that they must be examined to feel its real weight. Whether the laying a tax was deserving all the evils that have arisen from it, I should suppose no man could alledge that without being thought more fit for Bedlam than a seat in the Senate- but step by...